PIA News Service - Sunday, April 29, 2012


40 TESDA specialista recognized

By Michelle de Castro

AGUSAN DEL SUR, April 29 (PIA) -- A total of 40 individuals were officially recognized as ‘TESDA specialistas’ during the launch of TESDA specialista technopreneurship program (TSTP) held recently.

According to Engr. Norberto Dorado, TSTP focal person of TESDA Agusan del Sur provincial office, the specialistas will be under constant monitoring for six months for them to prove that they have put into action and perform what they learned during their training.

In an interview with Richard Fuentes, one of the specialistas from Trento town, he said he had discovered from within himself that in fact, he has so many hidden skills that were not applied before until they were discovered after he learned more from TESDA.

“I am very grateful and happy having discovered from within myself that aside from being a mechanic, I have still the talent to do welding jobs, machine shop, carpentry and so many other skills. Now I am not afraid to face the challenge that I will encounter in order to give my family a better life,” Fuentes said.

Also, Rufo Gause from San Francisco who finished a four-year course, had never practiced his profession, but instead, landed as appliances repairman. According to Gause, applying for a job in line with his course took him years, but was never given the chance. After a technical course that he finished with TESDA, he automatically earned a living that supports his family.

According to TESDA Sec. Emmanuel Joel Villanueva, the TSTP is an initiative of Pres. Benigno S. Aquino III in order to give livelihood to the Filipino people. Because of this reason, TESDA specialista technopreneurship program was introduced in Mindanao. (RER/DMS/PIA-Agusan del Sur)

DTI-Caraga strengthens advocacy campaign on Tobacco Act

By Robert E. Roperos

BUTUAN CITY, April 29 (PIA) -- The Department of Trade and Industry (DTI) in Caraga, is strengthening its advocacy campaign on Republic Act 9211, otherwise known as the Tobacco Act of 2003.

According to Elmer Natad, DTI-Caraga Arbitration Officer, they will inform the public especially the youth on the provisions of the law.

He says the law points out that smoking shall be absolutely prohibited in public places such as centers of youth activity such as playschools, preparatory schools, elementary schools, high schools, colleges and universities, youth hostels, and recreational facilities for persons under 18 years old.

The official added smoking is also prohibited in elevators and stairwells, as well as in location where fire hazards are present, including gas stations and storage areas for flammable liquids, gas, explosives or combustible materials; within the buildings and premises of public and private hospitals. Medical, dental, and optical clinics, health centers, nursing homes, dispensaries and laboratories; public conveyance and public facilities including airport and ship terminals and train and bus stations, restaurant and conference halls, except for separate smoking areas; and in food preparation areas.

However, the law stipulates that in all enclosed places that are open to the general public, private workplaces, and other places, where smoking may expose a person to the other than the smoker to tobacco smoke, the owner, proprietor, possessor, manager or administrator of such places shall establish smoking areas. Such areas may include a designated smoking area within the building, which may be in an open space or separate area with proper ventilation, but shall not be located within the same room that has been designated as a non-smoking area.

All designated smoking areas shall have at least one legible and visible sign posted with text "smoking area" for the Information and guidance of all concerned. In addition, the sign or not posted shall include a warning about the health effects of direct or secondhand exposure to tobacco smoke. Non-smoking areas shall likewise have at least one legible and visible sign, namely, “No smoking area” or “No Smoking.”

Under this Act, It shall be unlawful for any retailer or tobacco products to sell or distribute tobacco products to any minor, as well as for any person to purchase cigarettes or tobacco products from a minor. It is also considered unlawful for a minor to sell or buy cigarettes or any tobacco products and to smoke cigarettes or any other tobacco products.

Meanwhile, Natad said the law states that the sale or distribution of tobacco products is prohibited within 100 meters from any point of the perimeter of a school, public playground or other facility frequented particularly by minors.

In case of doubt as to the age of the buyer, the law stipulates that retailers shall verify, by means of any valid form of photographic identification containing the date of birth of the bearer that no individual purchasing a tobacco is below 18 years of age, Natad said.

The official is hoping that vendors and individuals, especially the youths should adhere to what have been stipulated in the law to avoid penalties.

On the first offense, any person or any business entity or establishment selling to, distributing or purchasing a cigarette or any other tobacco products for a minor shall be fined the amount of not less than P5,000 or an imprisonment of not more than 30 days, upon the discretion of the business licenses or permits in the case of a business entity or establishment.

If the violation is by establishment of business entity, the owner, president, manager, or the most senior officers thereof shall be liable for the offense.

If a minor is caught selling, buying or smoking cigarettes or any other tobacco products, the provisions of Article 189 of Presidential Decree No. 603 otherwise known as The Child and Youth Welfare Code, as amended, shall apply. (RER/PIA-Caraga)